THE INTERVIEW FLIP – day 11

FIVE DAYS IN MARCH

DAY 11

Who do you work for?

No one. I work on my own.

You’re self-employed?

Guess you could say I employ myself.

But you’re self-employed? Right?

You mean legally? Is there such a thing?

Sure.

What are the rules?

IRS rules.

Oh well. I don’t pay myself. I can’t afford it.

Who pays you?

No one.

Come on, who do you work for? We see you spending money.

On food and drink. That’s about it. Food is my work.

Do you declare those “food and “drink” expenses?

I don’t have anything to declare the food expenses against. I don’t make income.

Who do you cook for?

All those enslaved tortured and slaughtered. Dead and Alive. Do you want me to cook for you?

(nervose laughter)

No, come on. Do ya?

Whadya think, I’m going to be enslaved, tortured and slaughtered?

If you are you want me on your side.

Whadya think I’m a terrorist or somethin’?

You tell me.

Look, nobody’s comin’ after me to enslave, torture and slaughter me. Maybe it’s you they’re after.

Terrorists don’t get enslaved tortured and slaughtered. They do the enslaving, torturing and slaughtering. Which one are you?






 

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SKATING OVER WORDS – day 5

FIVE DAYS IN MARCH

DAY 5

Stop recreating the past. Create the future by writing about the present.

The past is gone. Random ties everything together. Does it really matter?

There’s too much detailed history in many articles I read – even too much detailed account in one current happening.

Unless you’re trying to change the past, then refer to history sparingly in as few words as possible.

When telling a current story, unless it’s necessary to the comprehension of the work, leave it out.

Viewers skate over details that go on and on. It’s too much for them to read. In doing so, they miss some of your more important or key points.

Most of your historical references are random. You find a way and a place to insert them. But do they really fit into the article as a whole – wrapping it all up, tying it all together? If the answer is yes, then you wouldn’t have to find a way or a place to insert them.

If your goal is to remind the viewer of the dark past of whatever, and that isn’t the focus of your article, then leave it out. People know the past. They don’t want a prejudicial history lesson every time they read an article.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight






 

RAW MATERIAL – day 6

FIVE DAYS IN MARCH

DAY 6

Raw material is necessary to build the foundation upon which I form my final conclusions.

To the writers and speakers of the world, use your raw material as a foundation to polish the thought. Don’t feel compelled to publish or speak everything that’s in your bank of ideas. Not all of them are good and not all of them are accurate.

I hear too much of that these days – all over the cable networks. Too many people have lost all integrity in what they communicate, and will say anything to get you to latch onto their agenda.

If you take the bait, then you’re grabbing onto a bunch of lies that in the end support only the person spewing them and not the ideals that you actually seek. Build your own bank of ideas. Make them make sense to you and then to others.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight








 

A ROLLING SENTENCE. AN EXAMPLE – day 7

FIVE DAYS IN MARCH

DAY 7

“A natural born molester of the innards, he relishes getting his creepy little fingers straight into the belly, that which should be the private space of all creatures, he invades, laughing all the while, like the devil he chose to be, sucking up the blood with his thirsty, vengeful eyes.”

Rolling sentences usually happen by accident, and we writers usually go back and fix them. You don’t have to if the communication works.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight